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Vegetables That Are Fruit and Other Common Foods That Aren't What You Think

Vegetables That Are Fruit and Other Common Foods That Aren't What You Think


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Not everything in life is what it seems — not the avocado on your toast or the jelly in your PB&J. Whether you have mistaken a veggie for a fruit or a nut for a legume, blame your parents, school system or supermarket and let’s course correct. Here are some foods that aren’t what you think.

Broccoli is a flower

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Yes, broccoli is a vegetable. However, this favorite springtime produce is better categorized as a flower. Vegetable is a general term for the edible portion of a herbaceous (soft-stemmed) plant. Flowers are a specific sort of vegetable, the kind whose aboveground parts are edible. In broccoli’s case, the flowering stalk is harvested prior to flowering, then added to your casserole.

Cauliflower and cabbage are flowers too

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Cauliflower and cabbage, just like broccoli, are flowering stalks. While these leafy foods may not fit the part of a flower, there are many other edible flowers complete with dainty petals in vibrant colors.

Quinoa is a seed

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Matters complicate a bit when classifying quinoa. For one, the Whole Grain Council recognizes quinoa as a pseudocereal, a sort of grain. However, botanically speaking, quinoa is a seed harvested from a herbaceous plant, aka a vegetable. Nutritious and versatile, quinoa makes an excellent and unexpected ingredient that goes great with eggs.

Rhubarb is a vegetable

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Tart rhubarb, famously paired with sweet fruits for the perfect pie filling, is no fruit at all. Instead, count the reddish, pink stalks among the veggies. But be wary, the green leaves that flower from rhubarb stalks and the roots that grow beneath are both toxic.

Avocados are fruit

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Though you may be accustomed to seeing them stacked atop each other beside the veggies in the produce section, avocados would be better placed alongside their fellow exotic fruits. While vegetables refer to the edible portion of a herbaceous plant, fruits are the edible reproductive body of a seed plant. Fruits grow on a plant and help get its seeds out into the world.

Pumpkins are fruits too

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Pumpkins, of Halloween and “pumpkin spice” fame, are fruit too. Like avocados, they grow on a plant and contain its seeds. In addition to furthering the plant’s reproductive means, pumpkins — like other fruits — are also known to have a sweet pulp.

Cocoa beans aren’t beans, but fruit seeds

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Step into any of America’s best dessert shops and you’d expect to see delicacies iced, filled, glazed or dipped in chocolate. Botanically, cocoa beans, the basis of your chocolate obsession, are not beans at all. Cocoa is made of dried seeds from the fruit of a tropical evergreen tree. Beans are seeds too, however, they grow from climbing plants, not trees.

Coffee beans aren’t beans either

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Whether you drink it in a latte, cappuccino or macchiato, coffee comes from a flowering shrub that grows cherry-like fruit. Each coffee cherry contains two pale seeds enclosed by pulp and an outer skin. Those seeds are harvested, dried then roasted. They are incorrectly, but more commonly known as coffee beans.

Peppers are fruits

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Red, yellow or green, sweet bell peppers of all varieties are fruits, not veggies. Spicy chili peppers, like one of Texas’ many official state foods, the jalepeño pepper, are fruits too.

Corn is not a vegetable but a grain and a fruit

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The Whole Grains Council rightly classifies corn as a grain. However, grains are also a sort of one-seeded fruit known as caryopsis or cereal grain. In caryopses, the fruit and seed fuse together making them ideal for drying. Tip: mix canned or fresh corn kernels with your pancake batter for an instant and unexpected pancake upgrade.

Peanuts are legumes, not nuts

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Despite their name, peanuts are not nuts, but legumes. A sort of vegetable, legumes are made up of various beans, lentils and peanuts. Frequently consumed as peanut butter, these legumes also fight memory loss.

Peas and chickpeas are legumes too

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Like peanuts, peas and chickpeas are also a part of the legume family. Given their high nutrient content, beans and peas are counted as part of The United States Department of Agriculture protein food group too.

Strawberries, blackberries and raspberries aren’t berries

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In a botanical sense, strawberries, blackberries and raspberries are fruit, yes, but not berries. Unlike berries, which are simple fruits stemming from one flower with a single ovary, strawberries, blackberries and raspberries are derived from one flower with more than one ovary. Still, do your heart a favor and snack on these non-berries and other heart-healthy foods.

Bananas are berries

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In addition to being “simple,” berries generally contain multiple seeds wrapped in a thin membrane surrounded by a fleshy pulp. A banana, therefore, counts as a berry — one with nearly unnoticeable seeds and a peel you can put to use as a natural cleaner at home.

So are tomatoes, kiwis and pomegranates

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Using those rules, tomatoes, kiwis and pomegranates (all delicious and unusual meat marinades) are also berries. Avocado is a berry too, just one with a single seed.

Brown sugar is white sugar

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Brown sugars and white sugars are both born from the same crop, the sugarcane or sugar beet plant. Refined brown sugars, the commercial sort you are used to, are most commonly made by mixing white sugar back in with a sugar-derived molasses. White sugar has an incredibly long shelf life. Brown sugar does too, but the added molasses means it is best to use it within two years.

White chocolate is not chocolate

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Though sure to be spotted at your state’s best chocolate shop, white chocolate holds no rightful claim to the chocolate name. Cocoa beans — those seeds harvested from tropical trees — are made up of cocoa butter and cocoa solids. White chocolate contains all butter and no solids, stripping it of the rich chocolate color.

Jelly is not jam, and jam is not jelly

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When putting together the best sandwich, do not use the words jam and jelly interchangeably. Jams are made with all edible components of the fruit. Jellies are made with only the liquid contents. While jellies spread easily, jams are texturally uneven.

Pringles aren’t chips, according to Pringles

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In 2009, Pringles attempted to convince a British court they were not crisps (read: chips) and therefore exempt from a certain tax. The court did not rule in the non-chip’s favor. Chip or no chip, count these crisps among foods and drinks putting your blood pressure through the roof.

Wasabi is most likely not wasabi

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Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…


Foods you think are vegetarian that aren’t

Being vegetarian should be a relatively simple thing. However, there are foods out there that you might expect to be veggie-friendly, which contain sneaky animal products. Occasionally, to get the right texture or look, animal products are used where you least expect them. You might not even bother checking the labels of these foods if they’re masquerading as something typically vegetarian-friendly. But never fear, normally there are vegetarian alternatives for every crafty non-veggie product.

Cheeses

Don’t panic just yet! This isn’t always the case but certain cheeses contain rennet (taken from calves’ stomachs) to aid in coagulation. However there are plenty of veggie cheeses without this unwelcome addition. Check the labels in health food shops and supermarkets to be sure. Common offenders include Parmesan, Gorgonzola and Grana Padano, which if made using the traditional method must contain rennet.

In the mood for a veggie feast? Try our whole baked ricotta cheese with lentils and cherry tomatoes for an indulgent supper.

Or, for something spicier, try this paneer with broccoli and sesame.

Mousses

Even creamy, chocolate mousse isn’t safe from secret meat products. Most supermarket mousses contain gelatine to help the setting process. However, it’s seriously easy to avoid this unexpected add-on, if the mousse is whipped thoroughly and chilled adequately in the fridge. Ingredients such as double cream and egg whites can create that moussey texture.

Bear Grylls’ chocolate mousse has just a handful of ingredients and is veggie to boot.

And for a refreshing make-ahead pud, check out this reduced-sugar mint-choc mousse.

Beer and wine

It’s safe to say even the most avid meat eaters would question why animal products would need to be used in the booze making process. Unless specified as veggie, it’s likely that animal products such as gelatin or fish bladders have been used to clarify wine and remove secondary yeast from beer. Don’t despair! As with everything, there are readily available veggie beers and wines.

Wondering whether a glass of wine has any hidden health benefits? Take a look at our guide on wine and nutrition.

Put your skills to the test and learn how to match wine with food.

Omega-3 enriched products

Products which aren’t naturally high in omega-3 but advertise themselves as being ‘enriched with omega-3’ are often not vegetarian, containing products derived from fish. Another buzz word is ‘heart-healthy’, which may also indicate the addition of fish-derived minerals.

Get your vegetarian sources of omega-3 from flaxseed, chia seed and walnuts. Our lemon roast vegetables with yogurt tahini and pomegranate are naturally full of omega-3.

Alternatively, if you want to get your omega-3 in before lunch, try our summer porridge or raspberry ripple chia pudding.

Soft drinks

Surprisingly, certain soft drinks can contain trace elements of gelatin, used as a stabaliser. Red soft drinks might also contain cochineal (derived from insects) as a colouring. It’s not that prevalent but always worth checking.

If you want to skip the addivitives and make your own soft drinks, our recipes are all you need. This carrot lemonade is a simple veggie drink you can make in 10 minutes.

And our blackcurrant cordial recipe is full of flavour with no hidden ingredients.

Pesto

If it doesn’t specify it’s veggie, it’s likely to contain our old meaty friend, Parmesan. Most traditional pesto recipes and shop-bought jars won’t be suitable for vegetarians. It’s worth double-checking pizzas and pastas which contain a drizzle of pesto, just to be sure. It’s often safer and simpler to whizz up your own sauce using a vegetarian Parmesan alternative.

There are a variety of greens you can substitute if you’re bored of basil too, read our guide to 11 alternative pesto recipes.

Crisps

You might expect crisps to be relatively safe, but it really is an ingredient jungle out there. Until recently, even the most meaty flavoured crisps were safe for veggies to eat. However, these days vegetarians have to contend with animal fat or meat extracts as part of the flavouring.

If you’re craving crisps, you can make your own veggie version in a flash. Why not try our sweet potato crisps?

It’s not just sweet potato that gets the crispy treatment, there’s a whole variety of veg you can pig out on – check out our guide to 5 ways with vegetable crisps.

Marshmallows

A lot of marshmallows contain gelatine to set them and give them that characteristic ‘wobble’. It’s always best to check packets when purchasing marshmallows as more often than not, they’ll be non-vegetarian.

Got a craving for soft and fluffy marshmallow sweetness? Try making our chocolate marshmallow wheels and watch them disappear.

Or go traditional with our malt hot chocolate s’mores with veggie mallows and chunks of chocolate.

We have a Good Food collection for every occasion, whether you’re looking to get that sweet sugar hit from our veggie dessert collection or a simple, filling veggie lunch.

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below…



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